Thoughts on releasing limited sneakersThought

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Oh My God – what a crazy weekend!? The worldwide release of the highly anticipated adidas Yeezy 350 Boost “Moonrock” went down and it was huge as usual. It seems as if the hype is still real and even growing. It’s a good time to speak about limited release practices in general.

The Yeezy Boost release is over and hundreds and thousands of people are complaining about so many things. First there’s online raffles – it seems as if nobody won. Then there’s online releases – gone in seconds. Did the adidas online release even begin? The chances to get a pair at an instore release were also very, very small – ok, you could have camped in front of the store for some day. Another thing is missing: So many Yeezy’s were available at Klekt for crazy prices only hours after the release.

 
Bildschirmfoto 2015-11-18 um 14.24.30adidas x Kanye West Yeezy 345 Boost “Moonrock” via Kane Holz
 

So there’s much going on and some of the complains are pretty much understandable. Our question is: How can stores and brands release highly hyped sneakers without causing complains of their customers? Is there any possibility to do a release that makes everybody happy? We’re not sure, but let’s play through some pro’s and con’s of the different release types.

First, there’s the classic instore release. People line outside the store for a time, “first come, first served”. Sounds easy and fair. Yes, it does, but only, if you have the time. Well, you could also add checking times. But that’s almost impossible to make for sneakerheads that don’t live nearby. We also heard about problems with Police at campouts in the last months.

Then there’s the online release. A certain amount of pairs is sold via the onlinestore and at a prearranged time. Sounds nice. But in many cases, there’s such a huge rush that servers can’t do it – also internet speed plays a role. And well, there’s bots.

A third idea is to do raffles. We are all used to seeing dozens of different raffle pics in our instagram feed all the time. But who secures that the promised amount of pairs is given away to the winners? Hard to see through. So, to make it easier and more transparent, sneaker stores started to host instore raffles. Everybody in need of a special shoe comes to the store and gets a number, then x numbers are drawn and the winners can purchase the shoe. Unfortunately, that’s 100% fair 2only in theory. Already at the first instore raffle, people brought their girlfriends, buddies and even their mums. So the one with the most friends or biggest family seems to have the biggest chance on winning his pairs. Damn.

 
People queuing for a raffle ticket in front of Asphaltgold
 

As far as we know, these are the most common release possibilities at the moment. And as you can see, none of them is “perfect”. Some stores try to mix their releases. Solebox just released it’s latest collab with Diadora and held the online release first, what led to an insane rush and collapsed servers. But it was a pretty nice try do give a bigger number of sneakerheads a chance to purchase.

We do not know a real solution to all the problems and the recent complains, we’re actually not sure if there’s a perfect solution, so we’re asking you. What is your favorite way sneakers can be released? What’s the most fair?

 

 

Oh My God – what a crazy weekend!? The worldwide release of the highly anticipated adidas Yeezy 350 Boost “Moonrock” went down and it was huge as usual. It seems as if the hype is still real and even growing. It’s a good time to speak about limited release practices in general.

The Yeezy Boost release is over and hundreds and thousands of people are complaining about so many things. First there’s online raffles – it seems as if nobody won. Then there’s online releases – gone in seconds. Did the adidas online release even begin? The chances to get a pair at an instore release were also very, very small – ok, you could have camped in front of the store for some day. Another thing is missing: So many Yeezy’s were available at Klekt for crazy prices only hours after the release.

 
Bildschirmfoto 2015-11-18 um 14.24.30adidas x Kanye West Yeezy 345 Boost “Moonrock” via Kane Holz
 

So there’s much going on and some of the complains are pretty much understandable. Our question is: How can stores and brands release highly hyped sneakers without causing complains of their customers? Is there any possibility to do a release that makes everybody happy? We’re not sure, but let’s play through some pro’s and con’s of the different release types.

First, there’s the classic instore release. People line outside the store for a time, “first come, first served”. Sounds easy and fair. Yes, it does, but only, if you have the time. Well, you could also add checking times. But that’s almost impossible to make for sneakerheads that don’t live nearby. We also heard about problems with Police at campouts in the last months.

Then there’s the online release. A certain amount of pairs is sold via the onlinestore and at a prearranged time. Sounds nice. But in many cases, there’s such a huge rush that servers can’t do it – also internet speed plays a role. And well, there’s bots.

A third idea is to do raffles. We are all used to seeing dozens of different raffle pics in our instagram feed all the time. But who secures that the promised amount of pairs is given away to the winners? Hard to see through. So, to make it easier and more transparent, sneaker stores started to host instore raffles. Everybody in need of a special shoe comes to the store and gets a number, then x numbers are drawn and the winners can purchase the shoe. Unfortunately, that’s 100% fair 2only in theory. Already at the first instore raffle, people brought their girlfriends, buddies and even their mums. So the one with the most friends or biggest family seems to have the biggest chance on winning his pairs. Damn.

 
People queuing for a raffle ticket in front of Asphaltgold
 

As far as we know, these are the most common release possibilities at the moment. And as you can see, none of them is “perfect”. Some stores try to mix their releases. Solebox just released it’s latest collab with Diadora and held the online release first, what led to an insane rush and collapsed servers. But it was a pretty nice try do give a bigger number of sneakerheads a chance to purchase.

We do not know a real solution to all the problems and the recent complains, we’re actually not sure if there’s a perfect solution, so we’re asking you. What is your favorite way sneakers can be released? What’s the most fair?

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